Prostate cancer is the result of cancerous cells dividing uncontrollably in the prostate — a small walnut-shaped gland in men. It usually develops slowly, so there may be no signs for many years. Symptoms of prostate cancer do not usually appear until the prostate is large enough to affect the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the penis (urethra), explains the NHS.

Sometimes, if the cancer has already spread, the aim is not to cure it but to prolong life and delay symptoms, notes the health body.

Am I at risk?

It’s not known exactly what causes prostate cancer, although a number of things can increase your risk of developing the condition.

Age, ethnicity, genetics and lifestyle factors can all contribute to your risk of prostate cancer.

According to Cancer Research UK, prostate cancer is most prevalent in men aged 75 to 79 years.

Researchers have found a link between being obese or overweight and cancers being higher grade (faster growing).

According to the NHS, research is ongoing into the links between diet and prostate cancer, and there is some evidence that a diet high in calcium is linked to an increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

What is most important is to focus on your overall dietary approach rather than singling out specific items.

As Cancer Research UK points out, having a healthy and balanced diet can reduce the risk of cancer by helping you keep a healthy weight or lose weight.

source: express.co.uk

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