England clinched a 1-0 Test series victory over Pakistan after a rain hampered final day of the third Test resulted in a draw.

The test will heavily be remembered for the rain and James Anderson’s breaking history by making the 600 wicket mark.

Though there was a number of impressive performances within the England team throughout the series.

Sportsmail’s Lawrence Booth gives his ratings of the stars who featured during England’s Test series wins over Pakistan and West Indies.

9 Stuart Broad 124 runs at 41.33, 29 wkts at 13.41

The decision to drop Broad from the first Test proved an unwitting stroke of genius. He spent the rest of the summer a man possessed. Above all, he pitched it up, claiming 11 lbws and eight caught-behinds. His batting, meanwhile, was better than it has been for years after working with former England coach Peter Moores.

9 Ben Stokes 372 runs at 62.00, 11 wkts at 14.36

A giant, once more, before family matters ended his summer two Tests early. The high point came in the second game against West Indies, when he displayed his versatility with an eight-hour 176 followed by 78 not out in 57 balls. And whenever Root needed a wicket, he’d ask Stokes to charge in and bowl bouncers.

8.5 Zak Crawley 417 runs at 69.50

England’s discovery of the summer – and by one run their leading scorer. Two innings hinted at his promise: 76 against West Indies and 53 against Pakistan, both in Southampton. But he entered hallowed turf with 267 in the final game, encouraging thoughts of a long and prosperous career.

Ben Stokes and Stuart Broad both shined for England during the two summer Tests

Ben Stokes and Stuart Broad both shined for England during the two summer Tests

8 James Anderson 32 runs at 10.66, 16 wkts at 25.50

At times, he was an unplayable as ever with the Dukes ball under grey skies. One quiet game, against Pakistan in Manchester, encouraged a rumour – started by a former team-mate in the Sky box – that he might retire. Soon after, he was taking his 29th Test five-for, then becoming the first seamer in history to tick off 600 wickets.

8 Jos Buttler 416 runs at 52.00; 21 catches

His batting was rejuvenated by a move up to No 6 for the third Test against West Indies, after which he averaged 83, including a match-winning stand of 139 with Woakes in the first Test against Pakistan, and a career-best 152 in the third. His keeping was mixed, and arguably cost England the first game against West Indies. Is there a case for turning him into a specialist No 6, and handing the gloves to Ben Foakes?

8 Chris Woakes 144 runs at 36.00, 17 wkts at 20.47

Not for the first time, showed his worth in English conditions. His five-for helped clinch a 2-1 win over West Indies, while his unbeaten 84 – after a dreadful run with the bat – rescued England from the dead in the first Test against Pakistan.

James Anderson achieved a historic milestone on the final day of the third Test with Pakistan

James Anderson achieved a historic milestone on the final day of the third Test with Pakistan

7 Dominic Sibley 324 runs at 36.00, no wkt for 7 runs

In five of his nine innings, he spent more than two hours at the crease, while his painstaking 120 against West Indies in Manchester suited England’s new plans to perfection. Found life harder against Pakistan, and must now improve his game against spin before winter series against Sri Lanka and India.

6 Jofra Archer 42 runs at 10.50, 8 wkts at 45.00

A quiet summer after the heroics of 2019, partly because he no longer had the new ball. In the one Test he did, he threatened to spoil West Indies’ pursuit of 200 at the Ageas Bowl. Made most headlines when he breached coronavirus protocol, missing the second Test against West Indies.

6 Dom Bess 111 runs at 55.50, 8 wkts at 55.50

England have invested much in their young off-spinner, but he still has a lot to learn, especially when trying to bowl an attacking line outside off stump. But he is gutsy and popular, and can bat.

Dominic Sibley found life harder during the Pakistan series in comparison to West Indies

Dominic Sibley found life harder during the Pakistan series in comparison to West Indies

6 Rory Burns 254 runs at 28.22

A summer of two halves. He averaged 46 against West Indies, despite getting into a tangle against the off-spin of Roston Chase, but just five against Pakistan, with left-arm quick Shaheen Shah Afridi dismissing him three times. Needs to be careful about planting his front foot too early, making him an lbw candidate.

6 Sam Curran 17 runs at 17.00, 4 wickets at 36.00

England’s logjam of quick bowlers meant Curran was limited to two Tests, but he dismissed top-order players in both: John Campbell, Shai Hope and Shamarh Brooks of West Indies, Abid Ali of Pakistan. His left-armers still provide crucial variety.

6 Ollie Pope 191 runs at 31.83

Produced two gems: 91 against West Indies and 62 against Pakistan, both in Manchester. But got into a tangle against Yasir Shah as the series progressed, and there will be plenty of spin to face this winter. Electric under the helmet at short leg.

Rory Burns also had a summer of two halves not hitting the same numbers against Pakistan

Rory Burns also had a summer of two halves not hitting the same numbers against Pakistan

6 Joe Root 224 runs at 37.33, 1 wkt at 42.00

Two series victories was offset by a skittish summer with the bat. He was never dismissed in single figures, but six times failed to progress beyond 42, often undone by looseness outside off stump. Also needs to find a way of cutting out the lax sessions with the ball which infected England’s play.

5 Joe Denly 47 runs at 23.50

The selectors finally lost patience after he began the West Indies series with 18 and 29 – scores typical of a career that never really got going.

5 Mark Wood 7 runs at 3.50, 2 wickets at 55.00

Unlucky to play only the first of the six Tests, though he wasn’t always as match fit as was being suggested. If England can get three Ashes Tests out of him in 2021-22, they’ll regard that as a triumph.

Pakistan series ratings

7.5 Azhar Ali 210 runs at 52.50.

Looked like a walking lbw until a technical tweak – no longer planting his front foot – changed his fortunes. Scored an unbeaten 141 in his side’s 273 in the third Test, but still faces a battle to keep the captaincy.

7.5 Mohammad Rizwan 161 runs at 40.25, 5 ct, 1st

Showed pluck and courage with the bat, and was superb behind the stumps. Comparisons with Buttler’s struggles were inevitable.

7 Mohammad Abbas 6 runs at 2.00, 5 wkts at 35.80

Almost impossible to hit, he went at 2.29 an over – more than a run tidier than any of his colleagues. But England felt more secure against him as the ball lost its hardness.

Azhar Ali shakes hands with James Anderson after the Englishman secured his 600th wicket

Azhar Ali shakes hands with James Anderson after the Englishman secured his 600th wicket

7 Babar Azam 195 runs at 48.75.

Seemed to be making a bid to join Test cricket’s Fab Four when he finished the first day at Manchester on 69, but never quite sparkled as brightly after that.

7 Shadab Khan 60 runs at 30.00, 2 wkts @ 23.50

Unlucky to be dropped after a solid first Test in which he ran England’s fielders ragged with quick singles, and picked up cheap wickets with his leg-spin.

7 Shan Masood 179 runs at 35.80, no wkt for 25 runs

Followed a career-best 156 – when he was missed twice by Buttler on 45 – with scores of 0, 1, 4 and 18 as Anderson reasserted his grip over the Pakistan opener.

7 Yasir Shah, 63 runs at 15.75, 11 wkts at 33.45

Took more than twice as many wickets as his nearest team-mate, but his leg-breaks ought to have secured victory during England’s first Test run-chase.

Shadab Khan was unfortunate to be dropped after a solid performance shown in the first Test

Shadab Khan was unfortunate to be dropped after a solid performance shown in the first Test

6 Abid Ali 139 runs at 27.80

A touch loose outside off stump, but he fought hard on the fourth day of the final game, and still has a Test average of 57.

5 Shaheen Shah Afridi 14 runs at 4.66, 5 wkts at 51.60

Dangerous when he got the new ball to swing, but surprisingly anodyne with the old ball, and waned as the series progressed.

5 Fawad Alam 21 runs at 10.50, 2 wkts at 23.00

Winner of the weirdest batting technique, standing chest on before a late 90-degree pivot. Waited 11 years for another crack at Test cricket, and fell fourth ball for nought.

Experienced batsman Asad Shafiq (left) had a shocker never reaching 30 in the series

Experienced batsman Asad Shafiq (left) had a shocker never reaching 30 in the series

5 Naseem Shah 5 runs at 1.66, 3 wkts at 69.33

Could be thrillingly fast, and produced a beauty to see off Root in the third Test, but otherwise this was a learning experience for the 17-year-old.

4 Asad Shafiq 67 runs at 13.40, 1 wkt at 24.00

Pakistan’s most experienced batsman after Azhar had a shocker, never reaching 30. Picked up his third Test wicket when he had Crawley stumped for 267.

source: dailymail.co.uk

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