Australia news live: Extinction Rebellion protesters disrupt grand final parade; disability royal commission report released

Extinction Rebellion protesters disrupt AFL grand final parade

Extinction Rebellion is claiming it has disrupted the AFL grand final parade by “gluing themselves to the road”.

In a statement, they claimed that three protesters glued themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles.

The activists were wearing shirts reading “Climate breakdown has begun”, with the other side of their shirts reading “No footy in 50 degrees C” a reference to the hot weather expected across grand final weekend.

Security removed the protesters after they glued themselves to the ground, with the parade continuing soon after.

Key events

We have some pics of the Extinction Rebellion disruptions to the AFL Grand Final Parade below:

Three Extinction Rebellion supporters have disrupted the AFL Grand Final parade in Melbourne by glueing themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles. Australia
Three Extinction Rebellion supporters have disrupted the AFL Grand Final parade in Melbourne by glueing themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles. Australia Photograph: Matt Hrkac/Supplied by Extinction Rebellion
Three Extinction Rebellion supporters have disrupted the AFL Grand Final parade in Melbourne by glueing themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles. Australia
Three Extinction Rebellion supporters have disrupted the AFL Grand Final parade in Melbourne by glueing themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles. Australia Photograph: Supplied by Extinction Rebellion
Extinction Rebellion protesters are seen attempting to disrupt the 2023 AFL Grand Final Parade in Melbourne, Friday, September 29, 2023. The Collingwood Magpies will play the Brisbane Lions in the 2023 AFL Grand Final on Saturday. (AAP Image/Joel Carrett)
Extinction Rebellion protesters are seen attempting to disrupt the 2023 AFL Grand Final Parade in Melbourne, Friday, September 29, 2023. The Collingwood Magpies will play the Brisbane Lions in the 2023 AFL Grand Final on Saturday. (AAP Image/Joel Carrett) Photograph: Joel Carrett/AAP
Three Extinction Rebellion supporters have disrupted the AFL Grand Final parade in Melbourne by glueing themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles. Australia
Three Extinction Rebellion supporters have disrupted the AFL Grand Final parade in Melbourne by glueing themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles. Australia Photograph: Supplied by Extinction Rebellion

US disappointed by Solomons snub

Daniel Hurst

Daniel Hurst

White House officials say they are disappointed that the prime minister of Solomon Islands declined to attend a summit between the US president, Joe Biden, and Pacific leaders in Washington.

But they have insisted that the US is in listening mode, not lecturing mode, amid intense competition for influence across the region.

The prime minister of Solomon Islands, Manasseh Sogavare, who struck a security agreement with China last year, said earlier this week that the US should stop “lecturing” Pacific leaders.

Sogavare was a notable absence from this week’s summit at the White House. The prime minister of Vanuatu, Sato Kilman, also did not attend but that was because he had to return to face a parliamentary vote of no confidence.

Mira Rapp-Hooper, the senior director for east Asia and Oceania at the White House’s national security council, told a media briefing today:

We were disappointed that Prime Minister Sogavare was unable to attend the summit in Washington.

We did reach out, including at the very highest levels, to encourage him to join us for this terrific conversation … this opportunity to engage amongst friends, and we’re disappointed that he declined to do so.

Rapp-Hooper said she didn’t “have much to say” about Sogavare’s recent comments about US lecturing, except to say all of the conversations with Pacific leaders this week were “collaborative, constructive, forward looking”.

She said the talks “involved an incredible amount of listening by US government officials to continue to refine their understanding of what our Pacific Island Forum friends are most looking for from us”. She added:

So that’s the approach that we’re going to continue to take. We continue to believe that it’s the right approach.

Extinction Rebellion protesters disrupt AFL grand final parade

Extinction Rebellion is claiming it has disrupted the AFL grand final parade by “gluing themselves to the road”.

In a statement, they claimed that three protesters glued themselves to the road in front of the cars carrying AFL players after four banner-holders halted the vehicles.

The activists were wearing shirts reading “Climate breakdown has begun”, with the other side of their shirts reading “No footy in 50 degrees C” a reference to the hot weather expected across grand final weekend.

Security removed the protesters after they glued themselves to the ground, with the parade continuing soon after.

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

Inquiry calls for establishment of disability support worker registry

The recommendations for the disability commission also called on the Australian government to establish a national disability support worker registration scheme by 1 July 2028.

The registration would include a code of conduct and minimum standards for registered disability support workers, including support coordinators.

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission should create an independent investigators panel, it stated. Where the panel decides NDIS participants experienced violence, abuse, neglect or exploitation they should be entitled to redress.

A dedicated First Nations Unit should also be established to develop its engagement with and understanding of the issues facing First Nations participants

States and territories should each establish or maintain an independent ‘one-stop shop’ complaint reporting, referral and support mechanism to receive reports of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of people with disabilities.

The report called on the federal government to set up a 1800 number and website, to direct people to their jurisdiction complaint.

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

Overrepresentation of people with disability in criminal justice settings must be addressed, inquiry report says

The recommendations from the royal commission into disability also included overhauls to the criminal system, including prohibiting solitary confinement in youth detention and raising the minimum age of criminal responsibility to age 14 in states and territories that haven’t done so.

It said the overrepresentation of people with disability in criminal justice settings and children with disability in youth detention settings needed to be addressed.

The report called on the Western Australian government to immediately cease confinement practices at youth detention centres amounting to the solitary confinement of children with disabilities and addresses high staff attrition rates in youth detention.

It said the New South Wales government should review existing policy regarding the use of seclusion for adults with cognitive disabilities.

The report also suggested increasing culturally safe disability services and supports for First Nations people with disabilities, and removing barriers to the NDIS in remote and very remote communities.

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

Phase-out of group homes recommended by disability inquiry

Another key recommendation from the report is to phase out group homes.

In Australia, 17,000 people live in group homes. The commissioners agreed that group homes should be phased out, though there are differing opinions on the timeframe.

Commissioners Bennett, Galbally, Mason and McEwin recommended governments develop and implement a comprehensive roadmap to phase out group homes within the next 15 years.

They recommended governments should cease the construction of new group homes within two years, stop placing residents in group homes within five years and develop a timeframe for transitioning residents within the next 15 years.

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

Disability inquiry recommends immediate action to limit use of restrictive practices such as restraints

There are 222 recommendations from the royal disability commission, which are aimed at improving the rights of the 4.4 million of Australians with disabilities.

Some more of the key recommendations include:

  • Taking immediate action to make sure restrictive practices, such as restraint, neck holds or seclusion, are not used as punishments or threats.

The commissions were decided about the future of the Australian Disability Enterprises – after hearing last year that the lowest wage an hour for a supported employee at one large ADE was $2.27 an hour.

Four commissioners recommended ADE should be phased out by 2034. All commissioners recommended the Australian government should introduce a scheme to ensure that employees with disabilities are paid at least half the minimum wage.

Housing was a big ticket time, with the commission recommending state and territory governments should commit to increasing the availability and supply of accessible and adaptive housing.

It called on state and territory governments to adopt the Australian Building Codes Board’s liveable housing design standard for all new dwellings.

More to come.

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

Disability royal commission recommends phasing out special/segregated education

One of the key recommendations from the royal commission into disabilities is a phasing out of special/segregated education.

The commissioners were split 3-3 on if schools should be phased out, with those in support recommending that:

No new special/segregated schools being built or new special/segregated classes or units being included within schools from 2025.

As part of this jurisdictions should offer equal access to mainstream education, by creating a legal entitlement for students with disabilities to enrol in a local mainstream school.

States and territories should establish an independent review process to enable a parent or supporter of a child or young person with disability to challenge a refusal to enrol a child in school.

PM praises Victorian Labor party’s swift resolution of leadership after Andrews resignation

The prime minister is speaking in Melbourne just after a Collingwood event, ahead of their grand final against Brisbane tomorrow.

He began by commenting on the resignation of Dan Andrews, saying he spoke to the now former Victorian premier earlier:

I spoke to Dan, and his intention is to take a bit of a break. Daniel Andrews has enormous capacity and he will be successful in whatever endeavour he now embarks on in his future life.

I am looking forward to meeting Jacinta Allan in a couple of hours as premier. I have known Jacinta for 25 years. She will make an extraordinary premier of Victoria and that will be a fantastic thing.

Asked if he was pleased to see the Victorian labor party resolve their leadership in one day, the PM said he was glad it went so smoothly:

It was good that it was worked through in such a smooth way. Jacinta Allan as premier, Ben Carroll as deputy, is a very good outcome. Vicky Ward, the new minister I have known for a long period of time. This is a very good government here in Victoria.

It is a government that makes the difference to the lives of Victorians. They are developing good policies to increase housing supply. They have led on so many social policy issues and I look forward to continuing to work with the Victorian government and Jacinta Allan as premier.

Disability royal commission recommends new anti-vilification law to ban insulting behaviour

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

The report includes over 220 recommendations and among the key recommendations are:

  • The government introduce a Disability Rights Act, which should include a set of guiding principles designed to promote and advance the rights of people with disabilities and eliminate disability discrimination, harassment and victimisation.

  • The Disability Discrimination Act should be amended to include behaviour that offends, insult, humiliate or intimidate another person or a group of people; and anti-vilification protections should be introduced.

  • For the financial years 2024–25 and 2025–26, the Australian government should commit additional funding of: $16.6m a year for the National Disability Advocacy Program and $20.3m a year for the National Disability Insurance Scheme Appeals Program.

Disability royal commission calls for ‘significant change’ to end abuse and exploitation

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

And the final report from the disability royal commission is live.

We have a lot to get through – it’s huge, 13 volumes.

The commission has said:

Our inquiry has shown people with disability continue to experience high rates of violence and abuse, multiple forms of neglect, and sexual and financial exploitation. Violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation are occurring across settings and contexts and throughout different stages of people’s lives. Based on their disability, people with disability continue to be excluded from participating in many areas of life.

Significant change is required.

The disability royal commission has recommended the government enact a Disability Rights Act to advance the rights of people with disability.

Disability royal commission fast facts: nearly 8,000 submissions, thousands of phone calls

Just some additional facts about the disability royal commission report expected today, with 7,944 submissions received.

There were 17,824 phone inquiries, 14 issues paper published, 710 responses to issue papers and 1,785 private sessions held.

The report has just been tabled and is available here.

Cait Kelly

Cait Kelly

Major recommendations expected with long-running disability commission report now tabled

Major reforms are expected to be recommended by the Disability Royal Commission today, with the final report tabled in parliament at 10am.

The commission has spent four and a half years investigating conditions for people with disabilities in schools, workplaces, jails, group homes, hospitals, and day programs.

Established in 2019 the royal commission heard evidence from almost 10,000 people through written submissions, private sessions and public hearings. It held 32 public hearings around the country.

It will be a big day – with responses from the government and major disability organisations. We will be blogging as it goes along.

Opposition’s Paterson says Taipan helicopter decision ‘sensible’

The opposition has voiced its support for the government’s decision to ground the Taipan helicopters, with shadow home affairs spokesman James Paterson saying it was “expected.”

Speaking on Sky News earlier today, Paterson said it was a “sensible decision”:

I think it is a sensible decision by the Australian Defence Force and the Albanese government. There have been known performance and safety issues with the Taipan platform for some time.

For that reason the previous government initiated a process to acquire the Black Hawk helicopters.

National Police Remembrance Day marks the loss of three young officers in past year

The families of police constables Matthew Arnold and Rachel McCrow have remembered the “evil” day their lives were shattered when both were gunned down, the AAP reports.

Friday marks National Police Remembrance Day when services are held across the country, with three officers killed on the job in the past 12 months.

The third name added to Canberra’s National Police Memorial this year will be that of 28-year-old Constable Anthony Woods who was run over and killed following a pursuit in June this year.

Constables Arnold, 26, and McCrow, 29, were following up a missing persons report on a remote Queensland property in December when they came under fire from a high-powered rifle.

Const Arnold was killed, while a wounded Const McCrow returned fire before she was also fatally shot.

In a statement the families said the pair epitomised what it meant to be a police officer, always putting others before themselves.

“Bright, brave, thoughtful and kind,” they said.

Outside of work, they were loyal friends, full of laughter, a devoted daughter and dedicated son – they impacted the lives of everyone around them.

Every day, our families deeply miss their presence, and our love and pride in both Matthew and Rachel will never waver.

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll said this year’s observance will be especially personal as she stands with the fallen officers’ families.

“It’s the worst thing that can happen in your commissionership, to get that phone call where you’ve lost an officer,” she said.

“It is incredibly important to show that we will never forget them.”

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk expressed her gratitude, as annual candlelight vigils were held across the state overnight to honour fallen police officers.

“Each year we are reminded of the police who have lost their lives in the line of duty and this year’s vigil will be especially significant as we honour the lives of Constables Matthew Arnold and Rachel McCrow,” Palaszczuk said.

Marles says military now focussing on getting Black Hawks into operation

Defence Minister Richard Marles was also on ABC News Breakfast this morning to discuss the decision to permanently ground the Taipan helicopters.

Marles said the decision to buy the choppers was made ‘a long time ago’ and that the military will focus on getting the Black Hawks into operation as quickly as possible.

There is now no world in which we would be flying the Taipans again.

Given that, we need to be getting the new capability, the Black Hawks, into operation as quickly as possible and that has to be our focus.

At the end of the day, we made the decision to move to Black Hawks, a decision that had been made before this tragedy occurred, but we needed to get more flying hours out of the platform

A Taipan helicopter on a runway with two airmen beside it
Taipan helicopters, like this one in Wollongong, are being ditched in favour of the more reliable Black Hawks. Photograph: Cpl. Kylie Gibson/AP

Minns challenges Sydney mayor to allow more residential development

NSW Premier Chris Minns has declared he is willing to take on long-time City of Sydney Mayor, Clover Moore, over housing, but added he is willing to “give peace a chance”.

Minns was on 2GB earlier this morning, and said it was unfair that Sydney’s outer suburbs were bearing the brunt of imposed housing targets, and that inner city suburbs needed to do more.

Frankly, the City of Sydney’s decision to effectively outlaw residential development close to the city, where there [are] hospitals and public transport and amenities and open space, it’s just not fair when you consider how much a suburb like Penrith of Riverstone or Camden has to take.

I mean, it’s like the mayor of New York City saying ‘New York’s full, we can’t have any more buildings’. It’s clearly not sustainable.

Heavenly trifecta tonight with a supermoon, Saturn and Jupiter all visible

The last supermoon of the year is due tonight, with the ideal time to see it around 6.30pm.

The supermoon happens when there is a full moon just as the moon is closest to Earth, since it doesn’t orbit Earth in a perfect circle.

Saturn and Jupiter should both also be visible tonight, with the best time to see them all just as the moon is rising.

A supermoon rises above trees.
With any luck, a supermoon like this one seen above Sydney last month, will be visible tonight. Photograph: Dan Himbrechts/AAP

source: theguardian.com