California judge BLOCKS school board from 'forced outing policy' that made staff tell parents if a student was trans or gender-nonconforming

A California judge has temporarily halted a policy advocates say was aimed at outing trans and non-binary students to their parents in one school district.

The San Bernardino Superior Court on Wednesday nullified Chino Valley Unified’s new rule regarding children who identify as trans or gender-nonconforming.

In August, state Attorney General Rob Bonta announced he would take legal action against the SoCal district as he said they violated the rights of LGBTQ+ students.

‘We’ve secured a temporary restraining order against Chino Valley Unified School District’s illegal and dangerous forced outing policy,’ Bonta announced on X.

The ‘parental notification’ policy immediately came under fire as it would have seen staff reporting an LGBTQ+ child to their parents if they changed their pronouns. 

In August, state Attorney General Rob Bonta (pictured) announced he would take legal action against the SoCal school district as he said it violates the rights of LGBTQ+ students

In August, state Attorney General Rob Bonta (pictured) announced he would take legal action against the SoCal school district as he said it violates the rights of LGBTQ+ students

CVUSD Board President Sonja Shaw - one of the biggest proponents for the policy - said she is committed to making sure the policy stays in place

CVUSD Board President Sonja Shaw – one of the biggest proponents for the policy – said she is committed to making sure the policy stays in place

During a June Chino Valley Unified School District meeting, more than 80 members of the public spoke out against the forced disclosure policy

During a June Chino Valley Unified School District meeting, more than 80 members of the public spoke out against the forced disclosure policy

On August 28, Bonta announced he would be filing a lawsuit against the Chino Valley Unified School District in the matter of the ‘parental notification’ policy. 

In a statement, Bonta said the restraining order ‘upholds the state rights of our LGBTQ+ student community and protects kids from harm.’ 

He said they will continue to challenge the policy in court and provide ‘unwavering support’ so each school district ‘promotes safety, privacy, and inclusivity.’

‘While this fight is far from over, today’s ruling takes a significant step towards ensuring the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of transgender and gender-nonconforming students,’ Bonta’s statement read. 

The issue will next be discussed again at a hearing on Oct. 13. 

In July, the district school board held a meeting on whether to adopt the controversial policy, which eventually passed by a 4-1 vote. 

The ‘parental notification’ policy requires personnel to ‘out’ transgender and gender nonconforming students to their parents or guardians without their consent. 

In Bonta’s lawsuit, the AG alleged that the policy would even out students against their express wishes.

At the school board meeting earlier this year, dozens of community members- held up signs and flags – speaking out against the forced disclosure policy.

'We've secured a temporary restraining order against Chino Valley Unified School District's illegal and dangerous forced outing policy,' Bonta announced on X

‘We’ve secured a temporary restraining order against Chino Valley Unified School District’s illegal and dangerous forced outing policy,’ Bonta announced on X

Pictured: Members of the Chino Valley United School District

Pictured: Members of the Chino Valley United School District 

Under the policy, Chino Valley schools would notify parents in writing within three days if district employees become aware that a student is asking to be identified or treated as a gender other than the one listed on official records. 

Parents will also be informed if students are accessing sex-segregated activities or using bathroom facilities that don’t align with their listed gender. 

The policy also outlines steps for schools to notify parents of injuries or threats to their children and suicide attempts.

Anthony De Marco, an attorney for Chino Valley Unified, told ABC 7 the policy would not affect students who were holding private conversations with teachers. 

‘We need those parents to be part of a successful transition,’ De Marco said. 

In August, Andi Johnston – a spokesperson for Chino Valley Unified – said the district is working with its attorneys to review the lawsuit. 

Johnston also said they were complying with state officials and have sent requested documents in response to a subpoena.

Supporters of the ‘parental notification’ system say it’s not about outing students but rather about protecting parents’ rights. 

CVUSD Board President Sonja Shaw – one of the biggest proponents for the policy – said she is committed to making sure the policy stays in place. 

‘We’re going to safeguard parental rights,’ Shaw said in a statement. ‘That is a constitutional right and we’re going to make sure that our parents at Chino Valley know they’re sending their kids here to be taught, not to be anything else.’ 

At the time the lawsuit was first filed, Shaw said she was not surprised as the state government has repeatedly taken steps ‘to shut parents out of their children’s lives.’

‘We will stand our ground and protect our children with all we can because we are not breaking the law,’ Shaw told ABC 7. 

‘Parents have a constitutional right in the upbringing of their children. Period.’

source: dailymail.co.uk