Joe Biden to unveil ‘Bidenomics’ plan in speech setting up re-election campaign – live

President to hail ‘Bidenomics in action’ in Chicago speech

Illinois’s Democratic senator Tammy Duckworth speaks before Joe Biden’s address on ‘Bidenomics’ in Chicago.
Illinois’s Democratic senator Tammy Duckworth speaks before Joe Biden’s address on ‘Bidenomics’ in Chicago. Photograph: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Joe Biden has arrived in Chicago and is about to start his speech on “Bidenomics”, as he will call his record on promoting employment and wage growth in the world’s largest economy over the two-and-a-half years since he took office.

“Today, the U.S. has had the highest economic growth among the world’s leading economies since the pandemic. We’ve added over 13 million jobs, more jobs in two years than any President has added in a four-year term,” the president will say, according to excerpts of his address released by the White House.​

“And folks, that’s no accident. That’s Bidenomics in action.”

Follow along here for more on the speech.

Key events

Joe Biden has started off his speech with a repudiation of trickle-down economics – the theory that lower taxes and fewer government regulations will bring gains for all.

“Folks, let me say as clearly as I can, the trickle-down approach failed the middle class. It failed America, blew up the deficit, increased inequity and weakening our infrastructure. It stripped the dignity, pride and hope out of communities one after another particularly through the midwest, western Pennsylvania and the west, People working as hard as ever couldn’t get ahead, because it’s harder to buy a home, pay for college education, start a business, retire with dignity,” the president said, restating a familiar message of his presidency.

President to hail ‘Bidenomics in action’ in Chicago speech

Illinois’s Democratic senator Tammy Duckworth speaks before Joe Biden’s address on ‘Bidenomics’ in Chicago.
Illinois’s Democratic senator Tammy Duckworth speaks before Joe Biden’s address on ‘Bidenomics’ in Chicago. Photograph: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Joe Biden has arrived in Chicago and is about to start his speech on “Bidenomics”, as he will call his record on promoting employment and wage growth in the world’s largest economy over the two-and-a-half years since he took office.

“Today, the U.S. has had the highest economic growth among the world’s leading economies since the pandemic. We’ve added over 13 million jobs, more jobs in two years than any President has added in a four-year term,” the president will say, according to excerpts of his address released by the White House.​

“And folks, that’s no accident. That’s Bidenomics in action.”

Follow along here for more on the speech.

Swaths of US gripped by bad air, extreme heat

Huge portions of the United States are today battling extreme heat, as well as air quality made worse by wildfire smoke.

Among the areas affected is Chicago, where reporters traveling with Joe Biden say he arrived to smoggy skies ahead of his speech on the economy scheduled to begin in about 15 minutes.

We at the Guardian have started up a live blog dedicated to following the worrisome weather conditions, and you can read it here:

Republicans gear up to attack ‘Bidenomics’

Republicans in Washington are trying to steal the show from Joe Biden, ahead of his address on his economic accomplishments in Chicago set for 1pm Eastern Time.

Top lawmakers in Washington have spent this morning insisting that the president has little to be proud of. Here’s speaker of the House Kevin McCarthy, summing the counterargument up in a tweet:

Mitch McConnell, the top Republican in Senate, has a whole web page dedicated to rebutting the president’s arguments.

The economy is an issue in every presidential election, and oftentimes the biggest one out there. Expect to hear a lot about this subject from Biden’s allies and enemies as his re-election campaign goes on.

Meanwhile, the stage is set for the president’s speech on “Bidenomics”, which will be held in a setting Batman fans may recognize, as the Chicago Sun-Times reports:

President Biden will deliver a speech on “Bidenomics” at the Old Post Office at noon. Fun fact: This entrance area was featured in “The Dark Knight” during the opening bank robbery scene. pic.twitter.com/8y5dADX9Xr

— TinaSfon (@TinaSfon) June 28, 2023

Indeed, the space where Joe Biden will speak appears to be the same area used in this scene from Batman epic The Dark Knight, around the one-minute mark.

Twenty years have passed since the United States invaded Iraq, and the country has dropped substantially in priority among Washington’s foreign policy concerns.

At the White House and in the halls of Congress, you are much more likely to hear about China, Russia and its invasion of Ukraine, or the perennial issue of Iran than about America’s relations with Baghdad. But it’s worth remembering that before he became vice-president under Barack Obama, or president 12 years later, Joe Biden played a major role in getting Congress to approve America’s invasion of Iraq.

Mark Weisbrot of the Center for Economic and Policy Research wrote about that in 2020, in a column for the Guardian:

Biden did vastly more than just vote for the war. Yet his role in bringing about that war remains mostly unknown or misunderstood by the public. When the war was debated and then authorized by the US Congress in 2002, Democrats controlled the Senate and Biden was chair of the Senate committee on foreign relations. Biden himself had enormous influence as chair and argued strongly in favor of the 2002 resolution granting President Bush the authority to invade Iraq.

“I do not believe this is a rush to war,” Biden said a few days before the vote. “I believe it is a march to peace and security. I believe that failure to overwhelmingly support this resolution is likely to enhance the prospects that war will occur …”

But he had a power much greater than his own words. He was able to choose all 18 witnesses in the main Senate hearings on Iraq. And he mainly chose people who supported a pro-war position. They argued in favor of “regime change as the stated US policy” and warned of “a nuclear-armed Saddam sometime in this decade”. That Iraqis would “welcome the United States as liberators” And that Iraq “permits known al-Qaida members to live and move freely about in Iraq” and that “they are being supported”.

The lies about al-Qaida were perhaps the most transparently obvious of the falsehoods created to justify the Iraq war. As anyone familiar with the subject matter could testify, Saddam Hussein ran a secular government and had a hatred, which was mutual, for religious extremists like al-Qaida. But Biden did not choose from among the many expert witnesses who would have explained that to the Senate, and to the media.

Then again, Joe Biden isn’t the only American president to mix up Iraq and Ukraine.

He may no longer occupy the White House, but George W Bush – the same one who ordered the US invasion of Iraq – did just the same thing last year:

‘I mean Ukraine’: George W Bush says Iraq invasion unjustified in speech gaffe – video

That Joe Biden makes gaffes and misstatements when speaking in public is nothing new. But as he stands for a second term in office, Republicans are seizing on every mistake to press their case that the 80-year-old president is in no position to serve another four years.

GOP-aligned Twitter accounts were quick to jump on Biden this morning after he incorrectly said Iraq when referring to Ukraine in remarks to reporters. So, too, were some Republican lawmakers, like Missouri’s senator Josh Hawley:

Bloomberg News reports this isn’t the first time he’s made that particular mistake:

Both last night at a fundraiser + then again this morning at the White House, President Biden referred to Ukraine as “Iraq” and said “my new best friend the prime minister of China” before correcting himself to say the Prime Minister of India.

— Nancy Cook (@nancook) June 28, 2023

As he left the White House for Chicago, Joe Biden shared his views on how the weekend rebellion against Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, has affected his grip on the country – and also made yet another gaffe:

Reporter: “To what extent has Vladimir Putin been weakened by recent events?”

President Biden: “It’s hard to tell, but he’s clearly losing the war in Iraq, he’s losing the war at home. And he has become a bit of a pariah around the world.” pic.twitter.com/vW4Saha9it

— The Recount (@therecount) June 28, 2023

Biden set to unveil ‘Bidenomics’ in Chicago speech

So just what is “Bidenomics”?

According to the White House, “it’s an economic vision centered around three key pillars”, specifically “Making smart public investments in America, empowering and educating workers to grow the middle class [and] promoting competition to lower costs and help entrepreneurs and small businesses thrive.”

“While our work isn’t finished, Bidenomics is already delivering for the American people. Our economy has added more than 13m jobs – including nearly 800,000 manufacturing jobs – and we’ve unleashed a manufacturing and clean energy boom,” the White House said in a fact sheet distributed today, also noting the drop in inflation and rise in small business activity.

The president is scheduled to make a speech outlining these accomplishments at 1pm Eastern Time in Chicago, setting the stage for them to be a key part of his re-election campaign.

Despite all that, Biden struck a curious tone when taking questions from reporters at the White House this morning when asked about the term – which isn’t all that different from the “Reaganomics” moniker used to refer to former Republican president Ronald Reagan’s policies.

Here’s the exchange, as captured by the Hill:

Biden to reporters, “you guys branded it. I didn’t. I never called it Bidenomics.”

Q: Your team is calling it that

Biden: “The first time it was used was in the Wall Street Journal…I don’t go around beating my chest ‘Bidenomics’ so the press started calling it Bidenomics.

— AlexGangitano (@AlexGangitano) June 28, 2023

More on Bidenomics-
Q: Do you not like it sir?
Biden: No, I like it, it’s fine

The White House this week has pushed out memos and talked about Bidenomics at briefings A LOT this week, for the record…

— AlexGangitano (@AlexGangitano) June 28, 2023

Joe Biden may be planning to campaign on his economic record, but polls indicate that argument may not work for many Americans.

Biden’s approval rating has been underwater for almost two years, but Americans are particularly distrustful of his handling of the economy. Consider this survey from the Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research released last month.

Its data shows the president’s approval at a typically low 40% – but when it comes to his handling of the economy, it’s even worse, with only 33% of American adults approving of what he’s done so far.

Joe Biden is on his way to Chicago right now from Washington DC to make what his administration is billing as a major speech on his economic accomplishments, but as he left the White House, the president took time to call out a conservative Republican senator.

The target was Alabama’s Tommy Tuberville, who tweeted this morning about how happy he was that his state would receive money to expand broadband access from a $42bn federal government program:

Broadband is vital for the success of our rural communities and for our entire economy.

Great to see Alabama receive crucial funds to boost ongoing broadband efforts. https://t.co/bLvQlSS3LH

— Coach Tommy Tuberville (@SenTuberville) June 27, 2023

But that program is paid for by the national infrastructure overhaul Congress approved with a bipartisan vote in 2021 – which Tuberville did not vote for.

That fact clearly did not escape Biden’s social media team, who invited the lawmaker to attend a public event with the president:

While Donald Trump could still face charges over the January 6 attack, Reuters reported yesterday on a newly released report that shows US security agencies failed to see the insurrection coming:

A new report detailing intelligence failures leading up to the January 6 attack on the US Capitol said government agencies responsible for anticipating trouble downplayed the threat even as the building was being stormed, in an attempt to stop certification of Joe Biden’s election victory.

The 105-page report, issued by Democrats on the Senate homeland security committee, said intelligence personnel at the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other agencies ignored warnings of violence in December 2020.

Such officials then blamed each other for failing to prevent the attack that ensued, which left more than 140 police officers injured and led to several deaths.

Trump classified documents trial faces delay

Donald Trump has now been indicted twice, first by Manhattan district attorney Alvin Bragg for allegedly falsifying business documents, and the second time by special prosecutor Jack Smith over the classified documents at Mar-a-Lago. While the former president has said he will not relent from his latest campaign for the White House even if convicted, a guilty verdict on any of those charges would nonetheless be a huge development.

Yet it’s possible neither trial is resolved before the November 2024 general election, where Trump could appear on ballots nationwide, assuming he wins the Republican nominating contest.

The Guardian’s Hugo Lowell reports that his trial in federal court over the Mar-a-Lago documents may be delayed until next spring:

Federal prosecutors in the classified documents case against Donald Trump have asked for a tentative trial date in December, but the complex nature of the US government’s own rules for using such secrets in court, and expected legal challenges, could delay the trial until at least the spring of 2024.

Trump was charged with retaining national defense information, including US nuclear secrets and plans for US retaliation in the event of an attack, which means his case will be tried under the rules laid out in the Classified Information Procedures Act, or Cipa.

The statute was passed in the 1980s to protect the government against the “graymail” problem in national security cases, a tactic where the defense threatens to reveal classified information at trial, betting that the government would prefer to drop the charges rather than risk disclosure.

Trump special counsel zeroes in on Giuliani, Georgia secretary of state

Good morning, US politics blog readers. Special counsel Jack Smith has already brought federal charges against Donald Trump over his involvement in hiding documents at Mar-a-Lago, but his investigation of the former president is far from over. Smith was tasked by attorney general Merrick Garland to also look into Trump’s involvement in the January 6 insurrection and the wider effort to overturn Joe Biden’s 2020 election victory, and new details have emerged of the direction of those inquiries.

Smith’s investigators will be interviewing Georgia secretary of state Brad Raffensperger today in Atlanta, the Washington Post reports, while Rudy Giuliani has already spoken to them, according to the Associated Press. The two men played starkly different roles in the legal maneuvers Trump attempted in the weeks after his election loss, with Raffensperger resisting entreaties from the president to stop the certification of Biden’s victory in Georgia, and Giuliani acting as a proxy for the president in his pressure campaign. We’ll be keeping our eyes open to see if more details of the investigation emerged today.

Here’s what else is going on:

  • Biden is heading to Chicago for a speech at 1pm eastern time on “Bidenomics” – the accomplishments in employment and wages he intends to campaign on as he seeks another term in the White House.

  • A judge appeared disinclined to move to federal court the case brought against Trump by the Manhattan district attorney for allegedly falsifying business records, denying the former president another opportunity to have the charges dismissed.

  • White House spokeswoman Olivia Dalton will take questions from reporters sometime after 9.30am.

source: theguardian.com