DC is the WFH capital, with 48.3% of workers remaining at home in 2021

Washington, D.C. has become America’s work from home capital – as 48.3 percent of employees worked remotely in 2021, new Census data revealed. 

The U.S. Census Bureau’s latest findings showed that DC has paved the way for remote work, with Seattle following close behind with 46.8 percent of employees working from home. 

San Francisco had 45.6 percent of its labor force working remotely, while Austin and Atlanta had 38.8 and 38.7 percent, respectively. 

Meanwhile, Memphis, El Paso, Texas and Wichita, Kansas, all trailed at the bottom with only 10 percent of employees working from home. 

Overall, the US reported that nearly 18 percent of its workforce was enjoying remote work, nearly three times the pre-pandemic rate. 

‘Work and commuting are central to American life, so the widespread adoption of working from home is a defining feature of the Covid-19 pandemic,’ Census Bureau statistician Michael Burrows said in a statement on Thursday.

‘With the number of people who primarily work from home tripling over just a two-year period, the pandemic has very strongly impacted the commuting landscape in the U.S.’

The US Census Bureau found Washington, D.C., Seattle, San Francisco, Austin and Atlanta are leading the work from home lifestyle, while Memphis, El Paso, Texas and Wichita, Kansas, all trailed behind with about 10 percent of its workforce working from home

The US Census Bureau found Washington, D.C., Seattle, San Francisco, Austin and Atlanta are leading the work from home lifestyle, while Memphis, El Paso, Texas and Wichita, Kansas, all trailed behind with about 10 percent of its workforce working from home

Following the surge of work from home culture during the height of COVD, 2021 saw three times as many people working from home than before the pandemic

Following the surge of work from home culture during the height of COVD, 2021 saw three times as many people working from home than before the pandemic 

Washington, D.C. nearly mirrored the national remote work average prior to the pandemic, reporting about 6 to 7 percent of its labor force working from home between 2017 and 2019. 

Among metro areas with a population of over 1 million, the capital ranked third in remote work with 33.1 percent, just below the San Jose metro-area at 34.8 percent and the San Francisco Bay Area at 35.1 percent.

Washington, Maryland, Colorado and Massachusetts all ranked among the highest percentage of home-base workers in the US, with all four states reporting about 24 percent of its labor force working from home in 2021. 

Mississippi ranked at the bottom with only 6.3 percent of employees working from home, up from 3.1 percent in 2019. 

Louisiana followed with 8.4 percent, and Wyoming reported nearly 8.9 percent. 

William Frey, a demographer with the Brookings Institution, told the Washington Post that the latest work from home number correlates with college education. 

Washington D.C. and Seattle both rank among the nation’s most-highly-educated cities, with 63 percent and 68 percent, respectively, of people 25 and older having a bachelor’s degree or higher. 

San Francisco, Austin and Atlanta followed closely behind, matching up with the recent remote-work figures. 

‘These are by and large magnets for younger, well-educated, computer-savvy adults often tied to the tech industry who are well positioned to work from home,’ Frey told the Post.

Fear of the coronavirus, which was primarily responsible for the surge in work from home culture, has plummeted, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics latest report finding that in August, only 6.5 percent of people worked remotely due to COVID

Fear of the coronavirus, which was primarily responsible for the surge in work from home culture, has plummeted, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics latest report finding that in August, only 6.5 percent of people worked remotely due to COVID

It matches a survey from the Pew Research Center earlier this year, which revealed that upper-income workers who have a four-year college degree are more likely to work from home than those who don’t have a bachelor’s. 

The survey showed that 65 percent of college graduates were more likely to say their work can be done remotely compared to 53 percent of their counterparts. 

Fear of the coronavirus, which was primarily responsible for the surge in work from home culture, has plummeted, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics latest report finding that in August, only 6.5 percent of people worked remotely because of COVID.  

More Americans who can work from home are working from home since the pandemic

Upper-income workers who have a four-year college degree are more likely to work from home than those who don't

Upper-income workers who have a four-year college degree are more likely to work from home than those who don’t (right) as more Americans who can work from home are working from home since the pandemic (left) 

The latest data from the Census Bureau came from the 2021 American Community Survey, which was released on Thursday.  

The survey typically relies on responses from 3.5 million households to provide 11 billion estimates each year about commuting times, internet access, family life, income, education levels, disabilities, military service and employment.

The estimates help inform how to distribute hundreds of billions of dollars in federal spending. Response rates significantly improved from 2020 to 2021.

source: dailymail.co.uk