Russia-Ukraine war live: rescuers search for dozens missing in Vinnytsia attack; war overshadows G20 meeting

Key events:

G20 leaders meet under cloud of Ukraine war

Finance leaders from the Group of 20 major economies are meeting in Bali, as host Indonesia urged for consensus amid the fallout from the war and rising economic pressures from soaring inflation.

Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said warned it could be “catastrophic” for low-income countries facing soaring food and energy prices if leaders did not come together.

Sri Mulyani said the world had high hopes that the group would be able to find a solution to the triple threat of war, rising commodity prices and their spillover effects on the ability of low-income countries to repay debt.

We are acutely aware that the cost of our failure to work together is more than we can afford. The humanitarian consequences for the world, and especially for many low income countries would be catastrophic.”

G20 members include western countries that have imposed sanctions on Russia and accuse it of war crimes in Ukraine as well as nations like China, India and South Africa, which have been more muted in their responses.

Sri Mulyani called for G20 members to talk less about politics and “build bridges between each other” to deliver more technical decisions and action.

We need to strengthen the spirit of multilateralism, we need to also build a safety net for our future cooperation,” she said.

Canada says Russian officials personally responsible for war crimes

Canada’s finance minister, Chrystia Freeland, has told Russian officials at a meeting of G20 finance leaders that she held them personally responsible for “war crimes” committed during Russia’s war in Ukraine, a western official said.

Freeland directly addressed the Russian delegation taking part in the meeting of the Group of 20 major economies, telling them on Friday:

It is not only generals who commit war crimes, it is the economic technocrats who allow the war to happen and to continue.”

Freeland told the opening G20 session that the war was the “single biggest threat to the global economy right now”, the official said.

The two-day meeting of G20 finance ministers and central bank chiefs from top economies started on the resort island of Bali under the shadow of a war that has roiled markets, spiked food prices and stoked breakneck inflation.

Indonesian finance minister, Sri Mulyani Indrawati, warned delegates that failure to tackle energy and food crises would be catastrophic and called on ministers to work together with a spirit of “cooperation, collaboration and consensus” because “the world is watching” for solutions.

The cost of our failure is more than we can afford,” she told delegates. “The humanitarian consequences for the world and for many low-income countries would be catastrophic.”

Ukraine will not disclose the official number of military casualties until the end of the war, deputy defence Minister Hanna Maliar has said.

Maliar cited potential harm of using the information on casualties to further inform Russian analysis and strategy as the reason for the lack of government data in a Facebook post late on Thursday.

Four-year-old girl killed in strike

A four-year-old girl was killed in the Vinnytsia strike with social media posts charting her life and death.

Footage – which the Guardian is not publishing – showed Liza Dmitrieva lying dead in her overturned pushchair.

“A girl is among the dead today in Vinnytsia, she was four years old, her name was Liza. The child was four years old! Her mother is in critical condition,” President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said in his latest national address.

Liza’s mother, Iryna had taken her to an education centre in a city most believed was far from the frontlines, a four-hour drive west of the capital, Kyiv.

But Liza never made it home. Just after 11am, three missiles of seven reportedly fired from a Russian submarine in the Black Sea smashed into the square. Amid the carnage, footage captured Liza lying dead in her overturned pushchair. Nearby is a severed foot. The arm of a soldier reaches for the pushchair.

Vinnytsia death toll climbs to 23, dozens missing

The central Ukrainian city of Vinnytsia is reeling from a Russian missile attack that struck civilian buildings and a cultural centre, killing at least 23 people – including three children – and wounding dozens more.

As the city of 370,000 – many of whom fled from eastern Ukraine to escape frontline artillery fire – wakes up, rescue teams continue to comb the wreckage as authorities report 39 people are still feared missing

Ukraine: footage appears to show moment after Russian missile hit Vinnytsia shopping mall – video

Ihor Klymenko, the national police chief, said only six of the dead had been identified so far. Of the 66 people taken to hospital, five remained in critical condition while 34 sustained severe injuries, Ukraine’s state emergency service said in an update issued just after 10pm on Thursday.

A Russian submarine in the Black Sea fired Kalibr cruise missiles at the city, the deputy head of Ukraine’s presidential office, Kyrylo Tymoshenko, wrote on the Telegram messaging app.

The Russian military did not immediately confirm the strike, but Margarita Simonyan, head of the state-controlled Russian television network RT, said on her messaging app channel that military officials told her a building in Vinnytsia was targeted because it housed Ukrainian “Nazis”.

Summary and welcome

Hello and welcome back to the Guardian’s rolling live coverage of Russia’s war in Ukraine.

I’m Samantha Lock and I will be bringing you all the latest developments for the next short while.

Finance leaders from the Group of 20 major economies are meeting in Bali today, as host Indonesia tries to find common ground in talks overshadowed by war.

Ukraine’s state emergency service says it is still searching for 46 people who are considered missing after a Russian missile strike in the city of Vinnytsia, in central Ukraine.

It is 7.30am in Kyiv and here is where things currently stand:

  • A top Ukrainian official said the missile attacks in Vinnytsia were an “approved military strategy” by Vladimir Putin. Mykhailo Podolyak, the head of Ukraine’s negotiating team and a key adviser to Zelenskiy, said Russian forces were attacking “peaceful” Ukrainian cities such as Vinnytsia, Kremenchuk, Chasiv Yar and Kharkiv in order to force Ukrainians to “peace at any price”, Podolyak wrote on Twitter. Russia’s attacks on peaceful Ukrainian cities were not a mistake but an approved military strategy
  • A four-year-old girl was killed in the Vinnytsia strike with social media posts charting her life and death. Footage – which the Guardian is not publishing – showed Liza Dmitrieva lying dead in her overturned pushchair. “A girl is among the dead today in Vinnytsia, she was four years old, her name was Liza. The child was four years old!” Zelenskiy said. “Her mother is in critical condition.”
  • The world’s largest security body has expressed “grave concern” about the alleged mistreatment of tens of thousands of Ukrainians in so-called filtration centres set up by Russia in Ukraine. Tens of thousands of civilians are taken to these centres in the self-proclaimed breakaway Donetsk People’s Republic in eastern Ukraine, before being deported to Russia, the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe said.
  • Russia has forcibly removed nearly 2 million people from Ukraine, including more than 200,000 children, since its invasion in February, Zelenskiy said. “It is still being established how many children Russian forces abducted and took out of Ukraine … The preliminary figure is dreadful – about 200,000 children,” he told the Ukraine Accountability Conference in The Hague on Thursday.
  • The United States and more than 40 other countries have agreed to coordinate investigations into suspected war crimes in Ukraine. On Thursday, 45 countries including European Union states as well as Britain, the US, Canada, Mexico and Australia at a conference in The Hague signed a political declaration to work together. With some 23,000 war crimes investigations now open and different countries heading teams, evidence needed to be credible and organised, officials said.
  • Ukraine’s infrastructure minister, Oleksandr Kubrakov, said Kyiv was “definitely a step closer” to reaching a deal to export grain through its Black Sea ports after talks with Russia, Turkey and the United Nations. Turkey earlier announced a deal with Ukraine, Russia and the UN aimed at resuming Ukrainian grain exports blocked by Russia.
  • Vladimir Putin signed into law tougher measures for individuals or entities considered “foreign agents” by Russia, as well as a new law equating defection with high treason. The new bill, which will come into force on 1 December, will broaden the definition of “foreign agents” to anyone deemed to have fallen “under foreign influence” or receiving support from abroad, not just foreign money.
  • Russia has begun “volunteer mobilisations” to address its soldier shortage, according to the Institute for the Study of War. In a new report, the US-based thinktank said the Kremlin had “likely ordered Russian ‘federal subjects’ (regions) to form volunteer battalions to participate in the Russian invasion of Ukraine, instead of declaring partial or full mobilisation in Russia”.
Emergency teams work at the site of a missile strike in Vinnytsia, Ukraine, where at least 23 people, including three children, were killed.
Emergency teams work at the site of a missile strike in Vinnytsia, Ukraine, where at least 23 people, including three children, were killed. Photograph: Roman Pilipey/EPA

source: theguardian.com