Brooklyn home next to MTA’s fake ‘townhouse’ vent lists for $6M

For the first time in 30 years, a Brooklyn Heights townhouse — located next door to the MTA’s famed Greek Revival subway ventilator disguised as another townhouse — has hit the market for $6 million, The Post has learned.

Located at 60 Joralemon St., the six-bedroom, four-bathroom abode is made up of four floors and has been fully customized over the years.

The current husband-and-wife owners — David Miller, a retired tax attorney, and Judith Miller, who fundraises for non-profits — first purchased the home back in 1991 for only $695,000, records show.

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“There are so many things to love about this house. From the top floors, you feel like you’re living in a treehouse,” David told The Post. “The backyard extends to the end of the block, so it feels really open and airy, you don’t feel like you’re in a backyard. And we love the neighborhood – living here has been like living in a little village right in the middle of New York City. We’ll miss it, but it’s time for a new family to cherish this home as we have for the past 30 years.”

“I believe that with transitions comes new paths and opportunities,” added Judith. “We wanted to make this move while we were still young and healthy enough to enjoy this next phase of lives.”

The Brooklyn Heights townhouse spans four floors.
The Brooklyn Heights townhouse spans four floors.
Glen E.Johnson
The stairs leading up to the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th floors.
The entryway hallway with stairs leading up to the second, third and fourth floors.
Joel PITRA
The hallway leading from the entryway.
A view of the formal dining room leading into the sunroom.
Joel PITRA
The formal living room.
The formal living room.
Joel PITRA
The family room.
The family room.
Joel PITRA

Built in 1845, the listing is described as a “once-in-a-lifetime century townhouse” that brings back “old-world luxury and charm.”

Weaving in contemporary upgrades, features include Sonos speakers, a quartet of marble wood-burning fireplaces throughout the home and a casual media room.

Spanning 3,280 square feet, the “entertainment-style” kitchen comes with a built-in banquette seating and eat-in island which leads to the unique offering of a double-wide backyard, the listing notes. The outdoors has an Italian-inspired garden area with space for alfresco dining.

The kitchen.
The kitchen with top-of-the-line appliances.
Joel PITRA
A breakfast nook.
A breakfast nook.
Joel PITRA
A den.
A den.
Joel PITRA
A media room.
A media room.
Joel PITRA
A view leading into one of the bathrooms.
A view leading into one of the bathrooms.
Joel PITRA

All the light fixture medallions throughout the residence have also been brushed with 14K gold.

Additionally, each bedroom has been hand-stenciled with oil paint and murals by artist Emma Tapley.

The primary suite spans the entire third level featuring a private dressing room, couples’ closets, a quiet study, and a windowed en-suite bathroom with marble tiles, double sinks, a walk-in shower, and a freestanding soaking tub. The fourth level has the remaining three bedrooms.

Tricia Lee with SERHANT holds the listing.

“We’ve seen great interest in the property in just a few days on the market,” Lee told The Post.

The primary bedroom on the third floor.
The primary bedroom on the third floor.
Joel PITRA
Murals in one of the bedrooms by artist Emma Tupley.
Murals in one of the bedrooms by artist Emma Tapley.
Joel PITRA
A vanity and dressing room.
A vanity and dressing room.
Joel PITRA
One of five bathrooms.
One of five bathrooms.
Joel PITRA
The doublewide backyard.
The doublewide backyard.
Glen E.Johnson
The townhouse at 60 Joralemon Street is located directly next door to 58 Joralemon Street — the Greek Revival subway ventilator for the MTA.
The townhouse at 60 Joralemon St. is located directly next door to 58 Joralemon St. — the Greek Revival subway ventilator for the MTA.
Glen E.Johnson

The townhouse is attached to 58 Joralemon St, a former townhouse that may look like a residential home at first glance but whose intentionally pitch-black windows signal that something is a little off.

It’s been an MTA property since the early 1900s, serving as an emergency exit where crew and passengers could escape if there were trouble in the tunnel.

It leads to the eastern end of the New York City Subway’s Joralemon Street Tunnel, on the 2, 3, 4 and 5 train lines.

source: nypost.com