Premier League chiefs 'ready to roll over current TV deal into next season'

Premier League chiefs ‘ready to roll over current TV deal worth £1.5bn a year into next season’ with ‘uncertainty over return of mass crowds complicating talks with broadcasters over package’

  • Talks have reportedly been held to roll over the current Premier League TV deal  
  • The announcement over the rights from 2022-23 would have been made by now 
  • As a result of uncertainty, The Mirror claims the deal will roll over by 12 months 
  • The same report has also revealed that TV companies are open to the suggestion

Premier League chiefs are ready to keep their current big-money TV deal rolling into next season with negotiations on a new long-term contract from 2022-23 to be put on hold, according to reports.

Top-flight fixtures are currently shared between Sky, BT Sport and Amazon Prime – while the BBC has also shown live games during the pandemic – and the announcement of rights from 2022-23 would typically have been revealed by this point.

But as a result of the uncertainty surrounding the return of large crowds due to the relaxing of lockdown measures, The Mirror claim talks have already been held to extend the terms in place at this point for another 12 months.

Premier League chiefs are in discussions over rolling over the current TV deal into next season

Premier League chiefs are in discussions over rolling over the current TV deal into next season

The coronavirus pandemic initially placed talks over the rights on hold but, with the new term fast approaching, preparations are now underway to ensure a smooth transition for broadcasters. 

The current Premier League TV deal is worth £1.5billion a year. 

There is believed to have been uncertainty over the nature of the package companies would be splashing out for.

Due to the fluid nature of the Covid-19 crisis, there will be a rough expectancy for when bigger numbers will return to games, but the date is far from set in concrete.

Top-flight fixtures are typically screened via giants Sky, BT Sport, the BBC and Amazon Prime

Top-flight fixtures are typically screened via giants Sky, BT Sport, the BBC and Amazon Prime

Negotiations, therefore, are said to be based around keeping the current deal with a view to restarting discussions over a long-term solution at the turn of the year.

The Mirror revealed that the Premier League have declined to comment on the suggestions – but insist that the TV companies are open to the concept. 

It has been explained in the same report that the Government would be required to sanction a ‘private sale’.

This type of transaction would see the deal brokered between the existing broadcasters instead of extending it for any potential competition.

The pandemic and uncertainty over the return of crowds has led to hesitancy from broadcasters over the potential package (pictured: Premier League CEO Richard Masters)

The pandemic and uncertainty over the return of crowds has led to hesitancy from broadcasters over the potential package (pictured: Premier League CEO Richard Masters)

The deal would then be structured to allow Sky Sports, BT Sport and Amazon to effectively keep the same positions thrashed out in 2018, the source goes on to add.

The rights packages took a 10 per cent tumble, down to £4.6billion, for three seasons up until 2022. 

Sky splashed out an eye-watering £3.75bn to screen 128 games per season, while BT spent £975million to be able to broadcast 52 fixtures.

The rights package for the Premier League took a 1 per cent drop, to £4.6bn, up until 2022

The rights package for the Premier League took a 10 per cent drop, to £4.6bn, up until 2022

Amazon were able to pounce and secure the rights for 20 more matches a season. 

Sportsmail revealed last month, meanwhile, that the Premier League’s TV rights packages have skyrocketed in value by almost 4,000 per cent since the first live clash was shown in 1992. 

The permissions sold to UK and overseas broadcasters made £232m almost three decades ago, while the latest sales generated £9.1bn – a rise of 3,822 per cent.

source: dailymail.co.uk