Stargazers gather across the US as the spectacular Beaver Moon coincides with a lunar eclipse

Stargazers gathered in cities across the US as the spectacular Beaver Moon – the full moon of November – coincided with a penumbral lunar eclipse.  

The eclipse began around 2.32am EST on Monday morning when the moon moved into the Earth’s outer shadow, giving it a darker appearance than normal. 

The full moon itself also drew crowds, with many photographers taking the opportunity to take a breathtaking snap.

The eclipse, which reached peak illumination around 4:30am EST according to Accuweather, is known as a penumbral lunar eclipse. 

They are different from a total lunar eclipse because it occurs when the moon moves into the Earth’s outer shadow, known as the penumbra.  

This means that the moon is not shining as brightly as usual, making it appear darker than normal. 

In contrast, during a total lunar eclipses, the change is much more dramatic due to the moon appearing to be deep red in colour.   

The November moon got its name for the time of year when beavers scurried to their shelters ahead of winter, according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac. It was also historically the time when hunters trapped beavers for their pelts.  

NEW YORK: The full moon rises behind people standing on The Edge viewing platform in Manhattan. Stargazers are gathering in cities across the US as the spectacular Beaver Moon coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse.

NEW YORK: The full moon rises behind people standing on The Edge viewing platform in Manhattan. Stargazers are gathering in cities across the US as the spectacular Beaver Moon coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse.

WASHINGTON DC: The Beaver Moon rises over the Capitol as it coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse, which makes the moon appear darker

WASHINGTON DC: The Beaver Moon rises over the Capitol as it coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse, which makes the moon appear darker

NEW YORK: The Beaver moon rises behind a care in Manhattan, New York City. A penumbral lunar eclipses are different from a total lunar eclipse because it occurs when the moon moves into the Earth's outer shadow, known as the penumbra.

NEW YORK: The Beaver moon rises behind a care in Manhattan, New York City. A penumbral lunar eclipses are different from a total lunar eclipse because it occurs when the moon moves into the Earth’s outer shadow, known as the penumbra.

KANSAS CITY: The Beaver Moon rises over Kansas City beyond Christmas lights as it coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse

KANSAS CITY: The Beaver Moon rises over Kansas City beyond Christmas lights as it coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse

The moon is sometimes known as the Frost Moon, the Freezing Moon and the Digging or Scratching Moon, dubbed for animals foraging for nuts among fallen leaves.

The last major astronomical event of November is Monday morning’s penumbral lunar eclipse, similar to the eclipse that took place in early July in North America, according to Accuweather.  

‘During a penumbral lunar eclipse, the moon passes through the Earth’s outer shadow, called the penumbra, and misses the darker inner shadow, which is known as the umbra,’ Accuweather said. 

‘This is different from a total lunar eclipse when the entire moon passes through the darker umbra.’

LA: A plane comes in to land at Los Angeles airport on Sunday with the Beaver Moon behind as stargazers watch for the eclipse

LA: A plane comes in to land at Los Angeles airport on Sunday with the Beaver Moon behind as stargazers watch for the eclipse

KANSAS CITY: The Beaver Moon rises beyond a stature of a Native American scout on top of a hill overlooking downtown Kansas City

KANSAS CITY: The Beaver Moon rises beyond a stature of a Native American scout on top of a hill overlooking downtown Kansas City

LA: The full moon rises behind a US flag at the Rose Bowl stadium in Pasadena, California, as stargazers gather in cities to watch the lunar eclipse

LA: The full moon rises behind a US flag at the Rose Bowl stadium in Pasadena, California, as stargazers gather in cities to watch the lunar eclipse

Penumbral lunar eclipses are subtle and not as easy to spot as the more dramatic total lunar eclipses because the moon only gets slightly darker.

About 85 per cent of the moon was expected to turn a shade darker during the peak or middle phase of the eclipse. 

While this type of shading effect of the moon is visible, your best chance to see it may be through a telescope, according to NASA.

Unlike with solar eclipses, eye protection is not necessary. 

NEW YORK: The full moon is seen by the George Washington Bridge on the Hudson River in New York as stargazers await the lunar eclipse

NEW YORK: The full moon is seen by the George Washington Bridge on the Hudson River in New York as stargazers await the lunar eclipse

NEW YORK: The full moon rises above the Hudson River near George Washington Bridge, as stargazers watch for the eclipse

NEW YORK: The full moon rises above the Hudson River near George Washington Bridge, as stargazers watch for the eclipse

NEW YORK: The Beaver Moon glows behind the Empire State Building in New York City as it coincides with the lunar eclipse

NEW YORK: The Beaver Moon glows behind the Empire State Building in New York City as it coincides with the lunar eclipse

NEW YORK: The full moon rises over New York City on Sunday night as many stargazers head out to watch the lunar eclipse in the night skies

NEW YORK: The full moon rises over New York City on Sunday night as many stargazers head out to watch the lunar eclipse in the night skies

source: dailymail.co.uk

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