The Nintendo Switch is a great plug-and-play gaming console, but the right accessories, such as screen protectors, controllers, and grips and docks can make it a superior experience. To help make your favorite Switch game more fun both at home and on the road, this list rounds up some of the best Nintendo Switch accessories to buy for your Switch console. 

Keep in mind that these products are all designed for the original Nintendo Switch console. While many of these might work with the newly released Switch Lite, such as the controllers, several items on the list won’t because of the Lite’s smaller design and screen or lack of video output. (Of course, there may be other versions to buy that are compatible with the Switch Lite.) Our picks of the best Nintendo Switch accessories are based on our testing, but if you have your own favorites to play with, feel free to shout them out in the comments. 

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Want to use your Bluetooth headphones with your Switch, but worried about lag? Creative’s adapter gets around that with aptX Low Latency codec support. Just pop the adapter into the USB-C port on the Switch, press its button and connect to your headset. I tested with the Tribit QuietPlus ANC headphones, which is on our best noise-canceling headphones under $100 list and supports aptX LL. Insert the included analog microphone into the Switch’s headset jack and you’re ready for voice chat during multiplayer games that support it like Overwatch and Fortnite. (A quick firmware update is needed for it to work, though.)

If you also have a PS4, the mic can be plugged into your controller for voice chat with that console. Plus, Creative includes a USB-C-to-USB-A adapter so you can connect your Bluetooth headphones to the PS4. 

The adapter also supports regular aptX and aptX HD codecs as well as SBC (subband codec). You just press the adapter’s button to choose. And while you might buy this for your Switch (or PS4) you can just move the adapter to your phone or computer and instantly use your headphones with those without having to connect all over again. For $40, the little kit is a pretty good deal. 

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Nintendo’s Switch Pro Controller feels better to play with than any other third-party full-size Switch controller we’ve tried. The Switch Pro Controller is also between $60 and $70 to buy. The PowerA wireless controller comes close and you can buy it for around $50 or less on Amazon, Best Buy, and more. The PowerA controller doesn’t have rumble, IR or Amiibo NFC support like the Switch Pro Controller does, but it does have motion controls. 

Its one added feature is two extra buttons on the bottom of the controller that can be mapped on the fly. It runs on AA-size batteries, too, so you don’t have to worry about running out of power as you play a game and you can always use rechargeables. Also, since the battery isn’t built-in, you don’t have to trash the controller once you’ve eaten through battery life and the battery stops holding a charge, unlike some other handheld controllers.

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You can recharge your Switch with just about any power bank but you’ll want something like this giant Anker battery to keep playing while you charge. The PowerCore Plus can deliver 45 watts of charging power through its USB-C port. It can also charge up other devices like your phone through its USB-A ports. The package also includes a 60-watt USB-C wall charger that can refill this massive bank in less than 3 and a half hours. 

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Playing on the Switch’s screen is fine when it’s only you playing, but if you add more players, you’ll need a larger display. The Auzai 15.6-inch display gives you that bigger screen while staying mobile. Attach the included USB-C cable to the Switch and to the display and another USB-C cable to an external power source (a battery like this Anker power bank) and you’re done. There are even decent-sounding built-in stereo speakers as well as a 3.5mm audio output if you want to connect headphones to the screen.

Color performance is just OK and brightness is fine for indoor use. But if you need something portable or you simply don’t have room for a regular external display, this Auzai display is worth the investment and one of our top picks among the best Nintendo Switch accessories. 

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The $60 ChargePlay Clutch charging case combines a battery (6,000-mAh) and a wide, sturdy kickstand into the body of a protective grip case. But its value doesn’t stop there. The Clutch’s grips are removable and, once removed from the main body, they magnetically snap together. Slot the Joy Cons into each grip and you have a controller that feels akin to using Nintendo’s Joy Con Grip. The only thing I didn’t like is that there’s nothing locking the Joy Con controller in, so they will slide up if you put too much upward force on their sticks. Otherwise, it’s a great combo for extended gaming on the go. 

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If you want to dock your Switch as well as expand your laptop’s port options when you’re not gaming, the $65 Dock Pro 60 is all you need. The slim, small, lightweight Nintendo Switch dock has two USB-C ports, one of which supports power input. Connect your Switch to the other USB-C port and use the dock’s HDMI port to connect to a TV or external (resolutions up to 4K UHD will work) and you’re already to start gaming with friends and family on a bigger screen. There are also two USB-A ports if you want to use a wired controller or charge wireless ones. 

Bonus for Samsung Galaxy device users: The Dock Pro 60 supports Samsung DeX so you can use your phone or tablet with an external display and a desktop-style experience. 

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The best of all worlds. It’ll charge the Switch for sure, but with both a USB-C PD port and a good old-fashioned USB-A port, it can charge anything from a smartphone to a wireless headphone to a full-on laptop, and most every device in between, including Kindles and iPads. It’s great for traveling, too, with its relatively small size, light weight and fold-up prongs.

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Not all USB-C chargers will support charging the Switch as well as powering it while docked. This one does, and at a fraction of the cost of Nintendo’s. Plus, it has a 5-foot charging cable so you have some room to plug in the Switch and continue to play handheld while you charge. 

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A good secondary or travel Switch dock. Nintendo’s large dock stays connected to my main living-room TV, while the Defway is connected to a smaller TV in another room for my kids. The back has USB-A, USB-C for power and HDMI connections. However, you’ll need to bring your own power supply like the Airmate mentioned above. The combo of the dock and power supply makes this a great option for travel. It is so lightweight, though, that when you take the Switch off of it, your attached cable can tip the dock up on end.  

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t’s like the regular PowerA Enhanced controller except smaller. The $50 Nano has the look, feel and features of the larger model including motion controls, rumble (not HD rumble, though) and mappable buttons. It runs on a built-in rechargeable battery instead of replaceable AA cells, though. A six-foot USB-C cable is included for charging; you’ll get up to 20 hours on a single charge.

The Nano is designed for travel (it even comes with a nice little pouch for storage), but it’s also good for kids or anyone with smaller hands. Also, while the shell is more compact, the buttons are full size, which is generally great. However, in a couple of games where I was button mashing furiously, I would regularly miss the Y button and hit the Home button instead — not great if you’re in the middle of a battle. At least the mappable buttons on the back of the controller made a workaround possible. 

One other minor point: I noticed the Bluetooth range on mine is a couple of feet shy of the full-size version’s range. It’s something easily solved by sitting a bit closer to the Switch and an acceptable compromise for an on-the-go Pro-style controller.

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Carelessly sliding the Switch in and out of its dock all the time can eventually result in some scratches to the display screen, and nobody wants a scratched screen. If you spend money on one piece of protection for your Switch to enhance your gaming experience, make it an inexpensive Nintendo Switch screen protector. The AmFilm tempered glass screen protector is easy to apply and doesn’t interfere with touchscreen performance. The bottom line is, if you have a Switch, you need a tempered glass screen protector, and this is a great tempered glass screen protector. Note that this screen protector won’t fit on a Switch Lite, which has a smaller screen.

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The Switch’s kickstand is fine in a pinch, but this is much better for tabletop play with your device. It adjust to three positions, folds flat for travel and has a passthrough in front so you can charge while you use it with all of your video games. There is a cheaper AmazonBasics one, but the Hori is sturdier and more stable for not much more money.  

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Attach the tiny USB-C dongle to the Switch and you’re good to play with this lightweight, comfortable gaming headset. It uses the company’s lossless 2.4GHz wireless for ultralow-latency wireless connectivity. I never experienced any dropouts or lag while using them, but SteelSeries includes a cable if you want to use it if you don’t want to risk it. The noise-canceling mic is detachable and the earcups turn and lie flat for easier travel. These will work with the Switch Lite, as well.

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An inexpensive way to simplify charging two pairs of your neon red and neon blue (or whichever spectacular colors you choose) Joy-Cons. I keep this plugged into the rear port of Nintendo’s dock and my kids don’t have an excuse for letting the batteries run down or not putting them away for safe storage.  

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Adding this Nintendo Switch case not only takes some of the creak out of playing a video game handheld, but gives you some much-needed extra controller grip for your game. It’ll also give you a little side, top, bottom and rear drop protection. This will not fit the Switch Lite, which is a little smaller than the regular Switch.

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Want a bit more grip than the Mumba Case offers? The GripCase includes three sets of replaceable grips to let you customize it for your hand size. The case also protects the top corners of your joy-cons while also giving you larger triggers for the ZL and ZR buttons. You can even dock the Switch without removing the case, though the case’s grips will interfere with the USB ports on the dock’s front. Still, if you have a household of users with hands large and small, this is a good way to go. Again, this won’t fit the Switch Lite.

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This splashproof hardshell case is just about all you need to protect your Switch if you want to play on the go. Slim, light and form-fitting, it barely adds any bulk. And there’s an organizer attached inside with storage for up to 10 game cards. Plus, it works with the Mumba case so you stay protected when traveling and playing. You guessed it — it won’t fit the Switch Lite.   

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The CitySlicker is a discreet way to travel with your Switch and accessories. The case looks more like a high-end travel bag than gaming gear, but it is made specifically for the Switch with five game card storage slots in front, a microfiber-faced interior pocket that swipes your screen clean when you insert and remove your Switch, and a zippered pocket on back to hold a power bank, cleaning cloth or earbuds. The two inside pockets are big enough to hold an extra set of joy-cons and cables. The case is available in three sizes for the Switch Lite, Switch and Switch Max, which is large enough to hold the Switch while it’s in the Skull & Co. GripCase or any similarly sized protective case. It’ll even fit the Defway dock listed above. 

Our friends at GameSpot also have a roundup: Best Nintendo Switch Controller 


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