Scientists believe the Earth has become unstable, with rapid and mass extinctions across the globe.

Measures have been taken, such as the Paris Climate Agreement, to save the planet but experts believe it might not be enough if humanity is to continue to thrive.

By 2050, the global population is forecasted to reach almost 10 billion people, and many scientists believe that will be a tipping point for humanity.

Ocean temperatures are also on the rise, which is causing the ice caps to melt and sea levels to rise.

As it stands, sea levels are rising at about 8mm a year due to melting ice, and while that does not seem like much, the implications for future generations could be huge.

Between 1993 and 2014, sea levels rose by 66mm – or roughly 3mm per year.

If it continues at the current rate, or gets faster, it could mean that coastal cities such as New York could be submerged by the end of the century.

But British icon and famed naturalist believes there is still time to save the planet, but humanity has to act now and collectively.

Speaking at the World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF) State of the Planet Address, Sir David said: “Now for the first time in 12,000 years we must face an unstable and unpredictable planet at exactly the time we are placing our greatest demands on it.

“We can still stabilise our planet once more. But there’s not much time. It will require significant global co-operation on issues like population growth, climate change and the management of our oceans.

“We will need to confront difficult questions like meat consumption and the deployment of new technologies.

“For any of this to succeed, we will need most people on Earth to understand the challenges and see the value in taking action.

“That is a communication challenge rather than a scientific one.”

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